2014 Donor Impact Report

Because of You

  • Aimen's wait for a heart is eased with new technology. Read more
  • We're able to treat Ariana's brain tumor with laser focus. Read more
  • We have our very own royalty: Queen Hailey! Read more
  • Cougar's journey to walk again begins now. Read more
  • Our cancer research brings kids like Grace closer to a cure. Read more
  • Tre has a chance at a normal life. Read more

A letter from the President

Every Gift Matters

The work at St. Louis Children's Hospital every day is inspiring, amazing and hopeful.

Every gift you make helps us bring healing and smiles to the little ones in our care. Whether we are researching new cancer drugs or bringing a fun "normal" celebration of teen life to our patients, we know we can count on you as our partners.

Explore the ways your support affects the patients and community of St. Louis Children's Hospital

Click the boxes to learn more

Aimen

12 years old

Aimen
Aimen is able to go to school and lead a normal life while he waits for his heart transplant

HeartWare, a ventricular assist device (VAD), provides a bridge to transplant for adults in heart failure. But could it work in a child?

Chemotherapy beat back his cancer, but took a life-threatening toll on his heart. Aimen needed a transplant, but had to be two years out from cancer treatment. HeartWare made it possible for Aimen to live a normal life while awaiting transplant.

See the new technology that doctors were able to use to keep Aimen alive and out of the hospital in this video.

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Ariana

8 years old

Ariana
Ariana's proton beam therapy preserves more of the healthy tissue around her brain tumor.

Doctors at Children's Hospital can now treat Ariana's brain tumor without causing harm to the rest of her body.

Ariana's family has always described her as spunky and energetic. Add those traits to the power of the proton beam and Ariana's family knows she has exactly what she needs to fight the malignant tumor found on the base of her skull.

Built on site, the first proton machine of its type in the world is housed at Children's Hospital. Check it out in this video.

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Hailey

16 years old

Hailey
Hailey beams after being crowned Prom Queen at Children's patient Prom.

It's never a convenient time for a teen-age girl to be hospitalized. But having to miss her prom? That's just heart-breaking.

Fortunately for one lovely, young lady, donors and staff at Children's Hospital made sure the prom came to her. The hospital's first-ever prom night was held in the hospital's atrium last spring. And, not only did Hailey get to attend the big event, she was voted prom queen.

See the process of transforming from patients to party-goers in our video.

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Cougar

15 years old

Cougar
Cougar prepares for a physical therapy session at Children's.

A debilitating injury won't stop one young man from realizing his dreams. We're working to make sure of it.

A dive into a snow bank may have caused a critical injury to Cougar's spinal cord, but it didn't hurt his spirit or alter his dreams. With an expert neurorehabilitation team helping him move forward, there's no doubt this natural athlete and scholar will go far.

Get a glimpse into Cougar's daily physical and occupational therapy as part of the neurorehabilitation program at Childrens.

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Grace

10 years old

Grace
Grace ringing the bell to singal the end of her cancer treatment.

Every so often, activity pauses and staff and patients fighting cancer turn their attention to a shiny gold bell.

Ringing that bell signifies the triumphant end of cancer treatment and recognizes the courage and inner strength of the child ringing it. Donor support through the Children's Discovery Institute allows our gifted pediatric oncologists to go from bedside to bench to uncover safer, less toxic treatments so that more bells can be rung.

In this video you'll meet Dr. Jeff Bednarski who is researching how and why Grace and other kids develop cancer, so that he can create the best way to beat it.

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Tre

20 years old

tre
Tre is ready to start the journey to health through a bone marrow transplant.

Doctors at St. Louis Children's Hospital couldn't offer a sickle cell anemia patient a cure without risk. Putting his life on the line, he took the risk.

A complete stem cell transplant would have had the potential of curing his sickle cell anemia. But when a full match could not be found, Tre put his life in the hands of his Children's Hospital doctors and his trust in half-matched stem cells. Only time will tell if Tre will be able to live his life sickle cell pain-free.

Tre and his mom share stories of Tre's 20 years of struggle and pain due to sickle cell anemia in our video.

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